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VAQUITA NEWS & UPDATES  | July 13th, 2019

In the past week, two events have brought much greater attention to the issue of the Critically Endangered vaquita, Mexico’s ‘desert porpoise.’  First, International Save the Vaquita (ISTV) Day was held on July 6th, and it is estimated that over 24,000 people were directly educated about the vaquita at the 26 events held all over the world, with over 200,000 more educated through social media postings!   Some events were held on nearby dates, with a very successful rally and meeting with the Mexican ambassador held in Washington, D.C. on July 12th.  ISTV Day is an annual event, coordinated by VIVA Vaquita and involving dozens of zoos, aquaria, parks, and other organizations.

 

Even more people will be exposed to the tragedy of the vaquita’s plight in the new movie ‘Sea of Shadows,’ which premiered this week and opens in theaters across the US this month.  The film, directed by Richard Ladkani and executive-produced by Leonardo DiCaprio, is a powerful and gripping exposé of the corruption and greed that are behind the vaquita’s tragic decline to numbers that may possibly be counted on the fingers of two hands, making it the most endangered mammal species on the planet!  The movie has already won several awards.  Here is the website for the movie:

 

https://www.nationalgeographic.com/films/sea-of-shadows/#/

 

and the trailer can be viewed below.

 

Both ISTV Day 2019 and ‘Sea of Shadows’ make it clear that, despite the very dire situation, it is not too late to save the vaquita and the other threatened species that share its beautiful habitat in the Sea of Cortez.  Before its too late, please go and see the movie, click on the Act Now page above, and do what you can to help us save the vaquita, Mexico’s ‘Panda of the Sea.’

 

 

 

 

Photos taken under permit (Oficio No. DR/488/08 from the Comisión Nacional de Áreas Naturale Protegidas (CONANP/Secretaría del Medio Ambiente y Recursos Naturales (SEMARNAT), within a natural protected area subject to special management and decreed as such by the Mexican Government. This work was made possible thanks to the collaboration and support of the Coordinador de Investigación y Conservación de Mamíferos Marinos at the Instituto Nacional de Ecología (INE).